The Ohio band’s sound was bluesy and directly pulled from classic rock like Thin Lizzy, but also carried a distinctly Southern sound à la The Allman Brothers. Star-shaped tambourine in hand, Perley led the group in a hard-driving set.”- Nashville Scene
Marked by Perley’s sultry, twangy vocals and guitarist Chris Connor’s electric-fuzz wizardry, The Howlin’ Moons create an enduring classic-rock sound that is appropriately road-weary, far from trendy, and still building steam.
— Kyle Harris, Westword
Perley’s vocals provide huge clarity and energy, yet remain soulful and rootsy, with a hazy quality that will become instantly recognizable.
— Megan Gnad, Maverick Magazine
The Howlin’ Moons’ gritty and gleefully unrestrained rock’n’roll complements and clashes perfectly with Ms. Perley’s sweet pop delivery.
— David Innes, R2 Magazine
Angela Perley and the Howlin’ Moons have spent years playing 100+ shows annually to refine the psychedelica tinged garage rock sound that defined their first album, 2014’s ‘Hey Kid.’ The hard work has paid off for last month’s release of their newest venture, “Homemade Vision,” as the group has successfully focused on their two main strengths: Ms. Perley’s emphatic, impassioned vocals and guitarist Chris Connor’s crisp, cathartic guitar melodies and high flying leads.
— Raymond E. Lee, No Depression
This Columbus, Ohio based group blends their unique alternative country sound with shades of old-school rock comparable to artists like the Black Keys, Jessica Lea Mayfield and Old 97’s.
— Nerdy Frames
The poppy alt-country track sounds like Jenny Lewis with the swagger of Joan Jett. Its cool, confident, and just plain badass.
— Adam Morgan, Surviving the Golden Age
Angela Perley & The Howlin’ Moons plant sonic roots deep in the heartland between the Yeah Yeah Yeah’s and Lady Antebellum, Lita Ford and the Lone Below.
— Keith Creighton, PopDose
Perley has all styles honed in collectively. She’s a Loretta Lynn fronting a David Gilmour side project, a Janis Joplin that chose Robby Krieger over Jim Morrison, a spun-out Stevie Nicks wrangled by The Dirt Band.
— Blake Berglund
Whilst it has that psychedelic rock feel that conjures a bygone era – Whisky a Go Go, Sunset Strip circa 1967…Chris Connor and Billy Zehnal, on lead guitar and bass, give it a real contemporary and dynamic edge that so complements Perley’s alluring vocals.
— Alex Gallacher, Folk Radio UK
Perley brings some Karen O rock & roll swagger to the thriving Americana scene, and the Moons add some ferocious Nick Zinner worthy guitar prowess to the affair.
— Keith Creighton, PopDose
Angela Perley cranks it up in her new session. Get on board with her & The Howlin’ Moons now before you’re kicking yourself later.
— Daytrotter
This group is the real deal, delivering contemporary rock ‘n’ roll that’s spiced with a healthy dose of good old fashioned southern country flavor.
— RadioInfo.com
Completely outstanding.
— Bob Harris, BBC Radio 2
Angela Perley & The Howlin’ Moons are a band on the rise. I can feel it in my bones and by the binaural sounds they make that fork their way onto my eardrums. At the heart of the group’s groove is the lead vocals and songwriting of Perley, brought to life by the lead guitar work of Chris Connor. Underneath the Howlin’ Moons’ sound and holding the rhythm are bassist Billy Zehnal and a network of Ohio-based drummers.
— Derek Halsey, City Beat
When backed by her band the Howlin’ Moons, Ohio native Angela Perley is most likely to unleash a torrent of roots-soaked rock ‘n’ roll.
— KDHX St. Louis
Coming in at #1, Angela Perley & The Howlin’ Moons. They have been unstoppable with “Electric Flame,” so many requests for it.
— Tom Butler, CD102.5 FM
Over the past year, Angela Perley has earned comparisons to virtually every big-voiced, ass-kicking female of the 21st century, from Grace Potter to Kacey Musgraves. On her debut album, though, the Ohio native carves out her own space in rock & roll, crooning and snarling her way through rootsy songs about love, lust and life in the Midwest. She’s joined by the Howlin’ Moons, a group of guitar slingers and rhythm players who play like a raw, ragged roadhouse band. The album is called Hey Kid, and we think it’s pretty great.
— Andrew Leahey, American Songwriter Magazine